Cover of: Military theory and practice in the age of Xenophon | J. K. Anderson

Military theory and practice in the age of Xenophon

  • 419 Pages
  • 1.46 MB
  • 3340 Downloads
  • English
by
University of California Press , Berkeley
Xenophon, Military art and science -- Greece -- History -- To 1500, Greece -- History, Military -- To 14

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Statement[by] J. K. Anderson.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsU33 .A5
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 419 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5075712M
ISBN 100520015649
LC Control Number74104010

Military theory and practice in the age of Xenophon Hardcover – January 1, by J. K Anderson (Author)Cited by: Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers/5(4).

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John Kinloch Anderson. University of California Press, Military theory and practice in the age of Xenophon book Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon: Author: John Kinloch Anderson: Edition: illustrated. Military theory and practice in the age of Xenophon by J. Anderson,University of California Press edition, in EnglishPages:   W.

McLeod; Military Theory and Practice in the age of Xenophon. By J. Anderson. (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. viii, 4Author: W. McLeod. Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon. viii, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, $ Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon.

viii, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, $ Show all authors. Download Military Theory And Practice In The Age Of Xenophon full book in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format, get it for read on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Military Theory And Practice In The Age Of Xenophon full free pdf books.

Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon Hardcover – 1 June by John Kinlich Anderson (Author) out of 5 stars 2 ratings.

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Amazon Price New from Used from Hardcover, 1 June "" — — —5/5(2). Anderson, Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon (Berkeley and Los Angeles ) 26 troops as well as other types of soldiers (perioikoi, neodamodeis etc.).

Buy Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon by Anderson, John Kinlich (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 3.

Xenophon alone calls Larisa ‘Egyptian’, but it is probably to be identified with the town of that name mentioned by Herodotus, owing its sobriquet to the presence of Egyptian settlers.

See Anderson, J. K., Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon (California, ), pp. –8. Anderson, J.

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Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon. Berkeley: University of California Press, Berkeley: University of California Press, The title gives the focus of. Xenophon c. B.C.-c. B.C. Greek historian and philosopher. Xenophon was a fourth-century Greek historian best known for his Hellenica, which began where Thucydides's History of the.

Once again, in this book as in the others, Machiavelli is quite specific in denouncing the contemporary military practice and in recommending the ancient practice, subject to certain modifications of his own design.

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This book contains less political theory and more military details than the other two, but all three repeat the same arguments. Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon. Find all books from Anderson, John Kinlich. At you can find used, antique and new books, compare results and immediately purchase your selection at the best price.

Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon Brand: University of California Press. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Military theory and practice in the age of Xenophon at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.5/5.

68 See Best, J. P., Thracian Peltasts and their Influence on Greek Warfare (Groningen, ), Parke, H. W., Greek Mercenary Soldiers (Oxford, ) as well as Anderson, J. K., Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon (California, ), although none mention these peltasts specifically. Xenophon wrote another book on leadership, based on his experience of a military campaign in which the Greeks fl ed for the Persians by fi ghting their way back to Greece (Xenophon ).

Xenophon's many and varied works represent a major source of information about the ancient Greek world: for example, about culture, politics, social life and history in the fourth century BC, Socrates, horses and hunting with dogs, the Athenian economy, and Sparta.

However, there has been controversy about how his works should be read. Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon. Berkeley: University of California Press. Anderson, J.K. Review of Greek Oared Ships B.C.

by J. Morrison. Classical Philology Casson, Lionel. The Ancient Mariners: Seafarers and Sea Fighters of the Mediterranean in Ancient Times, Princeton: Princeton. Xenophon has books on Goodreads with ratings. Xenophon’s most popular book is The Persian Expedition.

Military theory and practice in the age of Xenophon by J. K Anderson Xenophon's Anabasis, books I-IV by Xenophon Military training and the duties of the cavalry commander are dealt with in the Hipparchicus.

Written in about BC, the treatises of Xenophon were considered the earliest extant works on horsemanship in any literature. In his recommendations for a military encampment Xenophon begins a long tradition that includes Polybius, Vegetius, and Machiavelli, a tradition, inspired, perhaps, as much by the rational city planning of Hippodamus as the classical ideal of a harmonious urban order.

as by actual military practice. The military success of the Ten Thousand had less to do with the famous hoplite tactics than with the ability to adapt on the fly to widely different fighting conditions, especially marching while under pursuit (Xenophon, for instance, urged that they deploy in towns and villages when threatened in the rear by an attacking force, rather than.

Xenophon, (born c. bce, Attica, Greece—died shortly beforeAttica), Greek historian and philosopher whose numerous surviving works are valuable for their depiction of late Classical Anabasis (“Upcountry March”) in particular was highly regarded in antiquity and had a strong influence on Latin literature.

Life. Xenophon’s life history before is scantily recorded. esp. For the military lessons in the Cyropaedia, H.R. Breitenbach, 'Xenophon', RE IXA.2 () at and J.K. Anderson, Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon (Berkeley and Los Angeles ) 4 For Tigranes as a fictional character, Breitenbach (n.3) 5 For similarity to the Melian dialogue.

The Fourth Greek Book. Xenophon's Anabasis: The Last 4 Books: With Notes. by T.K. Arnold. Xenophon $ A wonderful literary instrument had been perfected in his time — the Attic prose of the golden age — and Xenophon wielded it with consummate art. Xenophon, son of Gryllos, an Athenian of the countryside, was born c.

and died in Corinth about the middle of the fourth century. Xenophon’s books on horsemanship (2 and 3) are well.

foundations of the state. We may find the elements of such a theory in a book that was written more than years ago, also about a war in Iraq: Xenophon's Education of Cyrus.2 According to Xenophon, Cyrus the Great got his start as the head of a Persian auxiliary force in Media's coalition against Assyria.

Xenophon alone calls Larisa 'Egyptian', but it is probably to be identified with the town of that name mentioned by Herodotus, owing its sobriquet to the presence of Egyptian settlers.

See J. Anderson, Military Theory and Practice in the Age of Xenophon (California, ), pp. and p. 35 Anab., Hell. Xenophon - Xenophon - Historical themes: Hellenica is a seven-book account of – in two distinct (perhaps chronologically widely separated) sections: the first (Book I and Book II through chapter 3, line 10) “completes” Thucydides (in largely un-Thucydidean fashion) by covering the last years of the Peloponnesian War (i.e., –); the second (the remainder) recounts the long.This article integrates theory and practice from the disparate writings of the historical figure Xenophon to offer his conceptualization of the leader/follower dyad.

Xenophon (c B.C.-c B.C.) was a Greek historian who left the tutelage of Socrates and the comforts of Athens to join the Greek army that was under the command of Cyrus the.A polemarch (/ ˈ p ɔː l ə ˌ m ɑːr k /, from Ancient Greek: πολέμαρχος, polemarchos) was a senior military title in various ancient Greek city states (poleis).The title is derived from the words polemos (war) and archon (ruler, leader) and translates as "warleader" or "warlord".

The name indicates that the polemarch's original function was to command the army; presumably the.